Rough Diplomacy

Game Theory : Prisoner’s Dilemma.

Prisoner’s Deliemma is by far the most famous example of Game Theory because it is one of the best ways to understand some basic game theory principles. The prisoner’s dilemma is a game that concerns two players — both suspects in a crime. They’re arrested and brought to a police station.…

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Game Theory : Nash Equilibrium pg1

In society today , it is suggested that what people identify as a nerd, is actually someone who knows their own mind well enough to distrust it.  Its someone who takes out societal bias to make decisions by the application of algorithms based off Game Theory. John von Neumann and…

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Property of the People: 45

Property of the People has just filed a lawsuit against the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) over the Bureau’s failure to comply with the group’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests for records on the FBI’s cyber-enabled surveillance platform named “Gravestone”. Very little is publicly known about Gravestone. In late 2016, Property of…

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categories of learning foreign native English speakers

Languages based upon Latin, such as French, Spanish and Italian are some of the easiest to pick up and are placed in ‘Category I’ languages with an estimated learning time of around 6 months. Languages such as Japanese, Korean and Arabic are placed in ‘Category V,’ and can take considerably longer and…

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Edward Harty

It was the 1950s,  young architects were imagining a new, post-War Britain. Edward Hartry though had more reason than most to believe that life could no longer rely upon old blueprints. He was Polish by birth, making a future as naturalised British citizen after a war that had made a…

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Destructive Interference

From the what-could-possibly-go-wrong department: Scientists have now managed to write executable code into DNA that is theoretically capable of infecting any computer that reads it. It’s not quite accurate to call it a virus, though this could be the closest to a virus  software has ever come. It consists of replication…

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Catalonia braced for violence as Spanish judge orders seizure of medieval treasures

For more than two decades, the medieval treasures of Spain’s Sijena Convent have been at the center of an ownership battle between the autonomous communities of Catalonia and Aragon. Now, the 44 artifacts kept in Catalonia’s Museum of Lleida have become a flashpoint in the independence crisis, as Aragon takes…

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Natale di Roma : Birth of Rome

Historical groups evoke ancient Roman tradtions with Natale di Roma. Every year in the city of Rome is a celebration of it’s beginnings. The holiday is Natale di Rome, or Birth of Rome. 2018 ,will mark the  2,771 year anniversary Rome. Rome is now the capital city of Italy. 2,000+ years ago…

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Spies,Lies and Double Agents : Klaus Fuchs

  Klaus Fuchs was just one of the many eccentrics chosen to work on the Manhattan Project. People remembered him as being serious, quiet, and earnest. He was also a spy — whose eventual capture lead to both the Red Scare and the arrest of the Rosenbergs. When choosing scientists…

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Silk Road

The Silk Road was dominated at first by Chinese silk destined for European aristocracies and then spread to other commodities  beginning  around 250 BC. It has threaded through Afghanistan for centuries. Afghanistan’s location, equidistant between the China Sea and the Mediterranean, made it a strategic ancient crossroads. The silk Road is…

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Salerno story

Salerno story In September 1943, 191 soldiers of Montgomery’s 8th Army downed guns and refused to take part in the battle for Salerno in southern Italy. It was the biggest wartime mutiny in British military history. The mutineers were all members of the Tyne Tees (50th)and Highland (51st) Divisions. Prior to the mutiny all bar…

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Silas Deane : Patriot Destroyed

Silas Deane, was Connecticut delegate to the Continental Congress, shortly, after he was ousted from his seat and was sent as the first American envoy to Paris in 1776. on a secret mission. The Committee of Congress for Secret Correspondence, was then formed . It’s members were Benjamin Franklin, Benjamin Harrison,…

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Revolutionary Colors

When there is a revolution a name or image is usually added to the movement to distinguish the characteristics of change. The White Revolution (  انقلابسفید‎‎ Enqelāb-e Sefid) In the 1960s and ’70s the shah sought to develop a more independent foreign policy and establish working relationships with the Soviet Union and Eastern European nations. …

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The Calcio Storico, The Most Brutal Sport on Earth

The Calcio Storico – ‘historic football’ – is an ancient form of football from the 16th century, which originated from the ancient roman ‘harpastum’, and is played in teams of 27, using both feet and hands. Sucker-punches and kicks to the head are prohibited but headbutting, punching, elbowing, and choking…

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Shaolin Senator

We have no background on this awesome clip other than the fact that the commenters insist it’s from Korea (and the day we can’t trust the info we get from YouTube commenters is the day we retire from the Internet). What we do know is it appears to be a…

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The Celtic War Queen Who Challenged Rome

Boudica slaughtered a Roman army. She torched Londinium, leaving a charred layer almost half a meter thick that can still be traced under modern London. According to the Roman historian Cornelius Tacitus, her army killed as many as 70,000 civilians in Londinium, Verulamium and Camulodunum, rushing ‘to cut throats, hang,…

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A Celtic Queen and Caractacus British leaders

Britain was a thorn in the side for Rome, requiring a disproportionate number of troops and proving a huge struggle to properly subdue. Author Mary Beard, compares the wars in Britian as Rome’s Afghanistan. However, it wasn’t fully conquered until only about  40 years after the initial invasion, when Agricola…

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A Celtic Queen’s Last Battle

Emperor Claudius was poisoned in 54, and Nero succeeded him. Perhaps to deflect the suspicion that he had been involved in his uncle’s murder, Nero elevated Claudius to the status of a god and ordered a temple to him built at Camulodunum. Now the British chieftains would be obliged not…

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The Loyal 9

In 1765, a group of colonists  called themselves the Loyal Nine , they wanted to protest the Stamp Act. As the group got bigger, they became known as the Sons of Liberty. Very little is known about the Loyal Nine as they operated in complete secrecy. Since they were a close-knit…

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Cutting Edge : French Revolution Bals des victimes

The Revolution and the Terror devastated French society, and then receded. In their place they left a weird, chaotic society with a very strange form of chic and an even stranger form of fashionable lady. The French Revolution was kickstarted by food shortages, but political change failed to supply people…

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Docendo Discimus

Docendo Dicimus is latin for ” by teaching , we learn “.Perhaps derived from Seneca the Younger (c. 4 BC – 65 AD), who says in his Letters to Lucilius, Book I, letter 7, section 8: Homines dum docent discunt. “Men learn while they teach” and during WWII there was a ton of such effort…

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The Bathhouse Plot

The 1991 Soviet coup d’état attempt, also known as the August Coup (Russian: Августовский путч, tr. Avgustovsky Putsch “August Push”), was an attempt by members of the Soviet Union’s government to take control of the country from Soviet President and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev. Background: By the mid-1980s, the Soviet Union was…

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What you know , and when you know it 

Howard Baker, who accomplished much in his years in Washington, may be best remembered for a single question he asked as a senator during the Watergate investigation. The most famous sentence  Baker ever uttered was his immortal line about Watergate: “What did the president know, and when did he know…

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The Orange Revolution: Origin

Orange Revolution – Term for the mass protests that followed the rigged presidential run-off elections between Viktor Yanukovych and Viktor Yushchenko in 2004. Though Yanukovych was declared the winner, protests forced the election to be annulled and the run-off was run again, with Yushchenko taking 52% of the vote. The…

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Orange Revolution: This Means War

February 2014 27-28 February: Pro-Russian gunmen seize key buildings in the Crimean capital, Simferopol. Unidentified gunmen in combat uniforms appear outside Crimea’s main airports. Fear and unease in Novo-Ozyorne 1 March 2014: Russia’s parliament approves President Vladimir Putin’s request to use force in Ukraine to protect Russian interests. Image copyrightAFPImage captionUnidentified…

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Orange Revolution : The Peacemakers

The division in Ukraine goes back 350 years. In 1654, when Ukrainians were fighting Polish rule, a Cossack leader named Bohdan Khmelnitsky swore allegiance to the Russian czar. Since then, Ukrainians have been dominated by Russia. Orthodox priests came To pray on the frontline , and voluntarily served as human…

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Dia De Los Muertos 

Día de los Muertos — also known as “Día de Muertos,” or “Day of the Dead” in English — is a holiday with Mexican origins that is celebrated on November 1 – 2. While some imagery might be close to that of Halloween, there are significant differences between the two.…

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Box 13 Scandal

The Box 13 scandal occurred in Alice, Texas during the Senate election of 1948. Lyndon B. Johnson was on the verge of losing the election and yet six days after polls had closed, 202 additional ballots were discovered in precinct 13, which swung the election decisively in Johnson’s favour. He had been in a tight race with Coke…

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The Doomsday Book

The Domesday Book recorded in two volumes the results of a great survey of the landholdings of England executed for William I of England, or William I (the Conqueror) Norman king of England. Its purpose was to find out what or how much each landholder had in land and livestock, and what it was…

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Spies, Lies and Double Agents :Duquesne Spy Ring

The Duquesne Spy Ring is the largest espionage case in United States history that ended in convictions. The day after Hitler declared war on the United States on Dec. 11, 1941, a Brooklyn jury returned convictions on a viperous nest of Nazi spies brought to justice by a humble but…

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Convicted members of Duquesne Spy Ring

The Duquesne Spy Ring is the largest espionage case in United States history that ended in convictions. A total of 33 members of a German espionage network Frederick Joubert Duquesne aka Fritz Joubert Duquesne FBI file photo. Born in Cape Colony, South Africa, on September 21, 1877, and naturalized a…

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Wife, Mother and Warrior Queen : Grace O’Malley

  Vilified by her English adversaries as ‘a woman who hath imprudently passed the part of womanhood’, Grace O’Malley  (c. 1530 – c. 1603; Irish: Gráinne Ní Mháille) was ignored by contemporary chroniclers in Ireland, yet her memory survived in native folklore. Nationalists later lionised her as Gráinne Mhaol, a warrior…

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You and what army: Ivor Thor-Gray

Ivor Thord-Gray (April 17, 1878 – August 18, 1964) was a Swedish-born adventurer, soldier, ethnologist, writer and linguist.He participated in 13 different wars across several continents. Biography He was born Thord Ivor Hallström in the Södermalm district in central Stockholm, Sweden as the second son of a primary school teacher,…

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Dresden Codex

The Dresden Codex is the oldest surviving book from the Americas, dating to the thirteenth or fourteenth century. The codex was rediscovered in the city of Dresden and is how the Maya book received its present name. It is located in the museum of the Saxon State Library in Dresden,…

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Spies, Lies , and Double Agents : The Thing

 The Thing ( Listening Device )  The Thing, also known as the Great Seal bug, was one of the first covert listening devices (or “bugs”) to use passive techniques to transmit an audio signal. It was concealed inside a gift given by the Soviets to the US Ambassador to Moscow.…

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You, and what army? : Apolônio de Carvalho

Apolônio de Carvalho (9 February 1912  – 23 September 2005) was a Brazilian socialist important in the history of the Workers’ Party (Brazil). Due to his communist ideals, Carvalho was expelled from the Brazilian Army and left for Spain to fight alongside the republicans in the Spanish civil war and…

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Remote Control: Stuxnet

    Stuxnet is a malicious cyberweapon believed to be a jointly built American-Israeli, although no organization or state has officially admitted responsibility. Anonymous US officials speaking to The Washington Post claimed the worm was developed  to sabotage Iran’s nuclear program with what would seem like a long series of…

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You, and what army? : Joseph R. Beyrle

Joseph R. Beyrle (August 25, 1923 – December 12, 2004) is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the United States Army and the Soviet Army in World War II. Born in Muskegon, Michigan, Beyrle graduated from high school in 1942 with the promise of a…

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Fallen Empire

Hannibal (247 – between 183 and 181 BC),fully Hannibal Barca, was a Punic military commander from Carthage, generally considered one of the greatest military commanders in history. Hamilcar Barca – Hannibal’s father, was the leading Carthaginian general during the First Punic War. He commanded the Carthaginian land forces in Sicily…

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